Korean J Community Nutr.  2003 Dec;8(6):977-985.

Body Composition, Food Intake and Clinical Blood Indices of Female College Students

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Nutrition, Seoul Women's University, Seoul, Korea. jheekim@swu.ac.kr

Abstract

This study was done to evaluate the health and nutritional status of female college students in Seoul. The subjects were 63 healthy college students aged 20 to 29 years. Their body composition, dietary intakes, clinical blood indices were investigated. Their body composition was determined by means of a multifreqency bioelectrical impedance analysis. Their dietary intake was determined using 3-day record method and their nutrient intake was analyzed by Computer Aided Nutritional analysis program for professional (CAN-pro). Their hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell (RBC), white blood cell (WBC) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) were determined by semi-automated microcell counter (F-520). Their plasma total cholesterol, TG, and HDL-cholesterol levels were measured using test kits. All data were statistically analyzed by SAS PC package program. Their average consumption of calcium, iron vitamin A, vitamin B2 and niacin were 63.3%, 65.0%, 85.2%, 89.2% and 95.2% of RDA, respectively. The overall mean values of the hematological indices in the female college students were within the normal range. However anemic subjects with hemoglobin (< 12 g/dl) and hematocrit (< 36%) accounted for about 20% of the subjects. The mean levels of total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and TG were 188.4 mg/dl, 69.9 mg/dl and 67.4 mg/dl, respectively. The percentages of the subjects with plasma total cholesterol level (> 200 mg/dl) and LDL-cholesterol (> 130 mg/dl) were about 41% and 30.4%, respectively. The data showed a significantly positive correlation between either body fat (%) or BMI and TG. However, there was a significantly negative correlation between either body fat (%) or BMI and HDL-cholesterol. These overall results suggest that it is necessary for college women to be educated regarding consuming more iron and vitamin C and less fat, in order to prevent iron deficiency anemia and/or cardiovascular diseases in later life.

Keyword

body composition; dietary intake; plasma lipids, hematological indices; female college students

MeSH Terms

Adipose Tissue
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency
Ascorbic Acid
Body Composition*
Calcium
Cardiovascular Diseases
Cholesterol
Eating*
Electric Impedance
Erythrocyte Indices
Erythrocytes
Female*
Hematocrit
Humans
Iron
Leukocytes
Niacin
Nutritional Status
Plasma
Reference Values
Riboflavin
Seoul
Vitamin A
Ascorbic Acid
Calcium
Cholesterol
Iron
Niacin
Riboflavin
Vitamin A
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