Korean J Med.  2012 Apr;82(4):411-416.

Secondary Hypertension Caused by Endocrine Disorders Except Primary Aldosteronism and Pheochromocytoma

Affiliations
  • 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. dongsun@hanyang.ac.kr

Abstract

Secondary hypertension can account for 15% of hypertension cases. The causes of secondary hypertension mostly come from renal diseases, such as renal parenchymal or renovascular disease, and endocrine diseases. The importance of diagnosing secondary hypertension lies in the fact that it may convert an incurable disease into a potentially curable disease. Even if the underlying disease may not be curable, being able to offer disease specific treatments may often make blood pressure control much easier. The causes of endocrine hypertension include primary aldosteronism, pheochromocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, acromegaly, hyper- or hypothyroidism, hyperparathyroidism and other mineralocorticoid hypertension (e.g. apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Liddle's syndrome). Primary aldosteronsim, pheochromocytoma, and Cushing's syndrome are among the common causes of endocrine hypertension. The first step in evaluating a patient with suspected endocrine-related hypertension is to exclude other secondary causes, particularly renal disorders. An accurate diagnosis of endocrine hypertension provides the clinician a unique treatment opportunity. This topic review will summarize rare causes of endocrine hypertension except primary aldosteronism and pheochromocytoma.

Keyword

Hypertension; Endocrine; Cushing's syndrome; Mineralocorticoids

MeSH Terms

Acromegaly
Blood Pressure
Cushing Syndrome
Endocrine System Diseases
Humans
Hyperaldosteronism
Hyperparathyroidism
Hypertension
Hypothyroidism
Mineralocorticoid Excess Syndrome, Apparent
Mineralocorticoids
Pheochromocytoma
Resin Cements
Mineralocorticoid Excess Syndrome, Apparent
Mineralocorticoids
Resin Cements
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