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Molecular Mechanisms of Primary Aldosteronism

Tevosian S, Fox SC, Ghayee HK

Primary aldosteronism (PA) results from excess production of mineralocorticoid hormone aldosterone by the adrenal cortex. It is normally caused either by unilateral aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) or by bilateral aldosterone excess...
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Corticosteroids Treatment in Spinal Cord and Neuromuscular Disorders

Na SJ

Corticosteroids are a class of steroid hormones that are produced in the adrenal cortex of the vertebrates, as well as the synthetic analogs of these hormones that are synthesized in...
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A case of 17 alpha-hydroxylase deficiency

Kim SM, Rhee JH

17alpha-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase are enzymes encoded by the CYP17A1 gene and are required for the synthesis of sex steroids and cortisol. In 17alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, there are low blood levels of...
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Pseudohypoaldosteronism Type 1

Cheong HI

Pseudohypoaldosteronism (PHA), a rare syndrome of systemic or renal mineralocorticoid resistance, is clinically characterized by hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, and elevated plasma aldosterone levels with either renal salt wasting or hypertension....
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Clinical Features of Congenital Adrenal Insufficiency Including Growth Patterns and Significance of ACTH Stimulation Test

Koh JW, Kim GH, Yoo HW, Yu J

Congenital adrenal insufficiency is caused by specific genetic mutations. Early suspicion and definite diagnosis are crucial because the disease can precipitate a life-threatening hypovolemic shock without prompt treatment. This study...
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Secondary Hypertension Caused by Endocrine Disorders Except Primary Aldosteronism and Pheochromocytoma

Kim DS

  • KMID: 2264288
  • Korean J Med.
  • 2012 Apr;82(4):411-416.
Secondary hypertension can account for 15% of hypertension cases. The causes of secondary hypertension mostly come from renal diseases, such as renal parenchymal or renovascular disease, and endocrine diseases. The...
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Congenital Adrenal Agenesis Presented with Adrenal Insufficiency

Park HK, Shim EJ, Lee KS, Hwang IT

We report a very rare case of congenital adrenal agenesis presented with adrenal insufficiency in a 4-day-old female newborn. She was admitted with darkish skin color and seizure. Her external...
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Hypertensive Hypokalemic Disorders

Choi KB

Hypokalemia is a common clinical problem. The kidney is responsible for long term potassium homoeostasis, as well as the serum potassium concentration. The main nephron site where K secretion is...
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A Case of Glycyrrhizin (Licorice)-induced Hypokalemic Myopathy

Kim BJ, Hong YH, Sung JJ, Park KS, Hyun CL, Choe G, Park SH, Lee KW

  • KMID: 2343238
  • J Korean Neurol Assoc.
  • 2006 Aug;24(4):389-391.
Glycyrrhizin, the main ingredient of licorice, may evoke severe hypokalemia and muscle paralysis by its mineralocorticoid effects. We present a 78-year-old man who developed subacute flaccid quadriparesis with a high...
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Effect of Mineralocorticoid on Serum Potassium Regulation and Urine Ammonium Excretion in Chronic Renal Patients

Lee SJ, Jeon US, Chin HJ, Huh WS, Cho YS, Kim KS, Joo KW, Han JS, Kim SG, Lee JS

  • KMID: 2079083
  • Korean J Nephrol.
  • 2000 Mar;19(2):278-284.
Mineralocorticoids influences on acid-base homeostasis by the regulation of urine acidification. But its mechanism of acion is not well known in human. This study compared the acid-base status and the...
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