J Korean Diabetes.  2017 Jun;18(2):63-70. 10.4093/jkd.2017.18.2.63.

Gut Microbiota and Metabolic Disorders

Affiliations
  • 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ky.hur@samsung.com

Abstract

The adult gut microbiota comprises 10~100 trillion microorganisms, which is equivalent to 10 times the number of total somatic and germ cells. Further, the collective genomes of gut microbiota (microbiome) contain 100~150-fold more genes than the human genome. The gut microbiota has coevolved with humans and has shown profound effects on various host responses. Recent findings have suggested that an altered gut microbial composition is associated with metabolic diseases, including obesity, diabetes, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. These findings indicate that the gut microbiota should be considered as an important factor to modulate host metabolism and metabolic disorders. If we could understand the alterations of the gut microbiota, in combination with dietary patterns, this might provide insights into how the gut microbiota contributes to disease progression and whether it could be a potential diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic target.

Keyword

Diet; Gut microbiota; Metabolism

MeSH Terms

Adult
Diet
Disease Progression
Gastrointestinal Microbiome*
Genome
Genome, Human
Germ Cells
Humans
Metabolic Diseases
Metabolism
Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease
Obesity
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