Korean J Otorhinolaryngol-Head Neck Surg.  2009 Aug;52(8):704-708. 10.3342/kjorl-hns.2009.52.8.704.

Cerebellar Venous Angioma Confused with Peripheral Vestibulopathy

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Gil Hospital, Gachon University of Medicine & Science, Incheon, Korea. febent@gilhospital.com

Abstract

Venous angioma is a congenital disease of vascular malformation, which is a mass like lesion consisted of dilated medullary veins. It is generally a silent lesion since it is found in normal brain tissues and tends to have low blood flow and pressure. The venous angioma could be diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging and angiography, but most of them are incidentally diagnosed, because it is usually asymptomatic. The patients with venous angioma have nonspecific symptoms, such as headache, nausea and vomiting, seizures, progressive neurological deficit and hemorrhage. In particular, the venous angioma in cerebellum could cause hearing disturbance, tinnitus and dizziness. We report a case of venous angioma in cerebellum that had been mistaken for peripheral vestibulopathy in a patient complaining of dizziness

Keyword

Central nervous system venous angioma; Cerebellum; Dizziness

MeSH Terms

Angiography
Brain
Central Nervous System Venous Angioma
Cerebellum
Dizziness
Headache
Hearing
Hemangioma
Hemorrhage
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Nausea
Seizures
Tinnitus
Vascular Malformations
Veins
Vomiting
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