Korean J Med.  2001 Aug;61(2):121-126.

A study of central venous hemodialysis catheter colonization and peripheral bacteremia in patients undergoing hemodialysis

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University, College of Medicine, Pusan, Korea. soobong1@netsgo.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Central venous hemodialysis is often used and is respectively safe in hemodialysis patients. But, many complications have been reported. Peripheral bacteremia after insertion of central venous hemodialysis catheter is a major cause of morbidity. We undertook a prospective study to investigate the colonization of central venous hemodialysis catheter and subsequent related episodes of peripheral bacteremia.
METHODS
Twenty-nine patients were enrolled ; who had been in hemodialysis program from July, 1999 to June, 2000 in Pusan National University Hospital. Blood cultures were taken from the catheter weekly after insertion. When the result of blood cultures through the central venous catheter became positive, indicating the colonization in the central venous catheter, peripheral venous blood cultures were taken before starting dialysis to detect the peripheral bacteremia. The data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney test.
RESULTS
The mean age of patients was 53 years old and a prospective study of 29 central venous hemodialysis catheter was performed. Seven catheters (24%) became colonized on their instrumental surface. The mean time to colonization was 21 days after insertion. The colonizing organisms were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus. Four catheters (13%) developed peripheral bacteremia with the same organism of colonization in the central venous catheter. The mean time to bacteremia was 19 days after insertion. The organisms of peripheral bacteremia were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=2), Staphylococcus aureus (1), Enterococcus (1). Bacteremia only occured when blood drawn through the catheter cultured more than 1000 colony forming units per mL. The risk of subsequent bacteremia is not related to time left in.
CONCLUSION
Bacterial colonization in the central venous catheter often led to bacteremia in hemodialysis patients. The risk of subsequent bacteremia is not related to time left in situ but to degree of colonization. In future, prospective study is needed in more patients.

Keyword

Catheterization; Hemodialysis; Bacteremia

MeSH Terms

Bacteremia*
Busan
Catheterization
Catheters*
Central Venous Catheters
Colon*
Dialysis
Enterococcus
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Renal Dialysis*
Staphylococcus aureus
Staphylococcus epidermidis
Stem Cells
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