Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr.  2019 Jul;22(4):387-391. 10.5223/pghn.2019.22.4.387.

Hepatotoxicity in an Adolescent with Black Iced Tea Overconsumption

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Paediatrics, Larnaca General Hospital, Larnaca, Cyprus. adamos@paidiatros.com
  • 2European University Medical School, Nicosia, Cyprus.
  • 3Third Department of Paediatrics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, General University Hospital “ATTIKON”, Athens, Greece.

Abstract

Tea is the most widely consumed beverage after water in the world. The consumption of iced tea has increased in Western countries and spiked among teenagers for enjoyment, freshening up and alertness. A teenager presented with symptoms of hepatitis. Liver ultrasound revealed sludge in the gallbladder. Laboratory investigations excluded all known causes of hepatotoxicity. Detail nutritional history revealed that the patient had been drinking 1.5-2 liters of black iced tea per day for the last three months. He was immediately advised to stop drinking any tea. Gradually all symptoms disappeared and two months after discontinuation of the tea, all liver enzymes returned to normal and the sludge in the gallbladder disappeared. This case report underlines the importance of a meticulous assessment of a child's dietary behavior when investigating a case of hepatotoxicity and raises awareness about the potential side effects of tea overconsumption.

Keyword

Tea; Chemical and drug induced liver injury; Teenagers

MeSH Terms

Adolescent*
Beverages
Drinking
Gallbladder
Hepatitis
Humans
Liver
Sewage
Tea*
Ultrasonography
Water
Sewage
Tea
Water

Figure

  • Fig. 1 Abdominal ultrasound scan showing sludge in the gallbladder.


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