Saf Health Work.  2014 Mar;5(1):13-16.

Do Psychological Factors Increase the Risk for Low Back Pain Among Nurses? A Comparing According to Cross-sectional and Prospective Analysis

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Occupational Health, Faculty of Health, Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Shahroud, Iran.
  • 2Biostatistics Department, Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences University, Tehran, Iran.
  • 3Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Shahroud, Iran. r_aliary@yahoo.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND
This study assesses influences of baseline psychological risk factors on prevalence of low back pain (LBP) at baseline and follow-up among nurses.
METHODS
A prospective longitudinal study was performed at two phases, baseline and 1-year follow-up among 246 nurses of university hospitals in Shahroud, Iran. A standardized Cultural and Psychosocial Influences on Disability questionnaire was used for data collection. Logistic regression was performed for analysis.
RESULTS
At the baseline of the study, 58.9% of nurses reported back pain in the previous 12 months. Age (p = 0.001), belief that work causes pain (p = 0.022), and somatization tendency (p = 0.002) significantly increased risk of LBP. At 1-year follow-up, prevalence of LBP was 45.7% and expectation of back pain at baseline (p = 0.016) significantly increased risk of LBP in this phase (p < 0.05).
CONCLUSION
Results indicate that risk factors for prevalence of back pain at baseline and 1-year follow-up are different. At baseline, the risk factors are age, belief that work causes pain, and somatization tendency, and at follow-up, expectation of pain is the major risk factor.

Keyword

Keywords; longitudinal study; low back pain; nurse; psychological; risk factors
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