J Korean Gastric Cancer Assoc.  2004 Dec;4(4):242-251.

Jejunal Pouch Interposition (JPI) after Distal Gastrectomy in Patients with Gastric Cancer

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon, Korea. kimwook@catholic.ac.kr

Abstract

PUPOSE: Recently, because of the increasing numbers of early gastric cancer patients and improvements in their survivals, greater attention has been directed towards the quality of life and nutritional status of gastric cancer patients after surgery. However, conventional reconstructions, Billroth- I, -II (B-I and B-II) or Roux-en-Y, have proven to have certain limitations, such as a small reservoir, and a malabsorption for iron, fat, calcium, and carotene. To overcome these limitations, we used a jejunal pouch interposition(JPI) after a distal gastrectomy not only to substitute for the small reservoir but also to maintain a physiologic pathway for ingested foods.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
A total of 196 gastric cancer patients who underwent a distal gastrectomy between March 2001 and February 2004 were divided into 3 groups: JPI group (n=100), B-I group (n=29), and B-II group (n=67). We assessed the patient's nutritional status, gastric emptying time, and gastrofiberscopic findings.
RESULTS
The percents of body weight loss at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years postoperatively in the JPI group (5.14%, 3.01%, 2.37%) were significantly less than those of the conventional B-I (8.41%, 6.69%, 5.90%) and B-II groups (7.50%, 7.65%, 5.86%) (P=0.011, 0.000, 0.013). The laboratory findings showed no significant differences between the 3 groups, except for a higher total protein level in the JPI group after 6 months postoperatively. Especially, stage I and II cancers in the JPI group showed much higher total protein levels after 1 year postoperatively. The gastric emptying times in the 99mTc- semisolid scans at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years postoperatively were 102.5, 83.1, and 58.1 minutes in the JPI group, 95.5, 92.0, and 58.5 minutes in the B-I group, and 53.9, 69.1, and 50.2 minutes in the B-II group, respectively. Also, the symptomatic gastric stasis detected with a gastrofiberscope during the early postoperative period (6 months) was gradually improved.
CONCLUSION
From a nutritional aspect, a jejunal pouch interposition after a distal gastrectomy could be an alternative reconstruction method, especially in stage I and II gastric cancer patients, in spite of the longer operation time and the probable delayed gastric emptying.

Keyword

Interposition; Jejunal pouch; Distal gastrectomy; Gastric cancer

MeSH Terms

Body Weight
Calcium
Carotenoids
Gastrectomy*
Gastric Emptying
Gastroparesis
Humans
Iron
Nutritional Status
Postoperative Period
Quality of Life
Stomach Neoplasms*
Calcium
Carotenoids
Iron
Full Text Links
  • JKGCA
Actions
Cited
CITED
export Copy
Close
Share
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
Similar articles
    DB Error: unknown error