Korean J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr.  2006 Sep;9(2):153-161.

Comparison of Clinical Manifestations of Rotaviral Gastroenteritis between Neonates and Infants

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Bucheon, Korea. pedsoon@schbc.ac.kr

Abstract

PURPOSE
This study was designed to investigate rotavirus infection by comparing the clinical characteristics in neonates and infants.
METHODS
We enrolled 104 neonates and 250 infants wiht gastroenteritis and a rotazyme test positive reaction at the Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital from February 2001 to January 2003.
RESULTS
The seasonal peaks of infection in infants occurred from February to June. However, in neonates, it occurred from October to December due to nursery outbreaks. Diarrhea, vomiting, fever and convulsions were significant symptoms in infants; however, metabolic acidosis with dehydration, jaundice, irritability, apnea, bloody stool, gastric residual, grunting, poor oral intake, lethargy as well as fever and diarrhea were more common in the neonates. Upper respiratory infection, pneumonia and bronchitis were present in the infants; however, necrotizing enterocolitis was more commonly observed in the in neonates. Among the patients with rotaviral infection, formula feeding was more popular than breast milk feeding in both the neonates and infants; however, this finding was not statistically significant.
CONCLUSION
Rotavirus can be a significant pathogen in neonates as well as infants. Neonates suffering from fever, poor oral intake, lethargy and apnea should be investigated for rotaviral infection. A new vaccine, rotaviral specific immunoglobulin and treatment guidelines are needed for eradicating rotavirus infection. Further studies on isolation, infection pathway, immune response and treatment of rotavirus are needed.

Keyword

Rotavirus; Neonates; Infants; Clinical manifestations
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