Cancer Res Treat.  2020 Apr;52(2):426-437. 10.4143/crt.2018.382.

Outcomes of Pregnancy after Breast Cancer in Korean Women:A Large Cohort Study

Affiliations
  • 1Center for Breast Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea
  • 2Division of Breast and Thyroid, Department of Surgery, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea
  • 3Cancer Survivorship Branch, National Cancer Control Institute, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea
  • 4Health Insurance Policy Research Institute, National Health Insurance Service, Wonju, Korea
  • 5Department of Laboratory Medicine, Center for Diagnostic Oncology, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea
  • 6Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea

Abstract

Purpose
The purpose of this study was to determine the rate and outcomes of pregnancies subsequent to breast cancer in Korea, and the effect of such pregnancies on the prognosis of women who survived breast cancer and subsequently conceived.
Materials and Methods
We followed a total of 31,761 Korean women 45 years of age or younger who were treated for primary breast cancer from 2002 to 2010. We also included follow-up surveys that were conducted through December 2011. We identified recurrence and mortality from breast cancer using data linked to the Korea National Health Insurance database. We used propensity score matching of the study cohort to analyze the risks of recurrence and mortality from breast cancer depending on pregnancy.
Results
Within our sample, 992 women (3.1%) became pregnant after receiving treatment for breast cancer. Of those, 622 (67.5%) successfully delivered; the remaining 370 (32.5%) failed to deliver. After propensity score matching, we found that the women who became pregnant after breast cancer did not have a different risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR], 0.503; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.434 to 0.584) and death (HR, 0.520; 95% CI, 0.397 to 0.681), compared with those who did not conceive after breast cancer treatment.
Conclusion
Our study is the first to report outcomes for Korean women who survived breast cancer and subsequently conceived. Women who survived breast cancer and subsequently became pregnant did not show a poorer survival outcome, compared with those who did not become pregnant.

Keyword

Breast neoplasms; Pregnancy; Cancer survivors
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