Nutr Res Pract.  2017 Aug;11(4):340-346. 10.4162/nrp.2017.11.4.340.

Factors affecting vegetable preference in adolescents: stages of change and social cognitive theory

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Food and Nutrition, Changwon National University, 20 Changwondaehak-ro, Uichanggu, Gyeongnam 51140, Korea. khl@changwon.ac.kr

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES
Despite the importance of consuming sufficient amounts of vegetables, daily vegetable intake among adolescents in Korea is lower than the current dietary recommendation. The objective of this study was to examine determinants affecting vegetable preference in order to suggest a stage-tailored education strategy that can promote vegetable consumption in adolescents.
SUBJECTS/METHODS
Adolescents (n = 400, aged 16-17 years) from two high schools participated in a cross-sectional study. Survey variables were vegetable preference, the social cognitive theory (SCT) and stages of change (SOC) constructs. Based on vegetable preference, subjects were classified into two groups: a low-preference group (LPG) and a high-preference group (HPG). SOC was subdivided into pre-action and action/maintenance stages. To compare SCT components and SOC related to vegetable preference, chi-squared and t-tests, along with stepwise multiple-regression analysis, were applied.
RESULTS
In the LPG, a similar number of subjects were classified into each stage. Significant differences in self-efficacy, affective attitudes, and vegetable accessibility at home and school were detected among the stages. Subjects in the HPG were mainly at the maintenance stage (81%), and there were significant differences among the stages regarding self-efficacy, affective attitudes, and parenting practice. In the predictions of vegetable preference, self-efficacy and parenting practice had a significant effect in the "pre-action" stage. In the action/maintenance stage, outcome expectation, affective attitudes, and vegetable accessibility at school had significant predictive value. In predicting the vegetable preference for all subjects, 42.8% of the predictive variance was accounted for by affective attitudes, self-efficacy, and vegetable accessibility at school.
CONCLUSION
The study revealed that different determinants affect adolescent vegetable preference in each stage. Self-efficacy and affective attitudes are important determinants affecting vegetable preference. Additionally, school-based nutrition intervention that focuses on enhancing affective attitudes, self-efficacy, and vegetable exposure may constitute an effective education strategy for promoting vegetable consumption among adolescents.

Keyword

Stages of change; social cognitive theory; vegetable preference; adolescents

MeSH Terms

Adolescent*
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education
Humans
Korea
Parenting
Parents
Penicillin G Benzathine
Vegetables*
Penicillin G Benzathine
Full Text Links
  • NRP
Actions
Cited
CITED
export Copy
Close
Share
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
Similar articles
    DB Error: unknown error