J Nutr Health.  2016 Dec;49(6):495-505. 10.4163/jnh.2016.49.6.495.

Effect of working patterns on eating habits in manufacturing workers of Gwangju area

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Food and Nutrition, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea.
  • 2Department of Food and Nutrition, Chosun University, Gwangju 61452, Korea. leejj80@chosun.ac.kr

Abstract

PURPOSE
This study was conducted to investigate and analyze the association between stress from shift and non-shift work as well as the effects living habits have on eating habits in order to identify why and how workers can improve their health and form proper eating habits for higher working efficiency.
METHODS
The subjects of this study were 361 workers from K manufacturing company from April 7 to 11, 2014 and they were surveyed using a questionnaire. The subjects were divided into two groups according to working pattern: shift workers (n = 216) and non-shift workers (n = 110).
RESULTS
In the general characteristics, there were significant differences in age, work career, work time, marriage, monthly income, and education levels between the two groups. For healthy behaviors, significant differences in subjective health status, moderate physical activity, drinking, smoking, and sleep time were observed between shift workers and non-shift workers. For eating habits, scores of non-shift workers having a regular mealtime, balanced meal composition, and vegetable and seaweed intakes were significantly higher than those of shift workers. The sum score of dietary habits in non-shift workers was also significantly lower than that in shift workers (p < 0.05). Total job stress score did not significantly differ between the two groups.
CONCLUSION
The sum of eating habit scores according to work types was 16.1 ± 0.6 in non-shift workers and 14.0 ± 0.3 in shift workers. These results suggest that it is necessary to provide food suitable to characteristics of different workers according to work type which should be provided along with daily nutrition counseling to help subjects recognize their status.

Keyword

eating habit; shift work; working pattern; job stress

MeSH Terms

Counseling
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Drinking
Eating*
Education
Food Habits
Gwangju*
Marriage
Meals
Motor Activity
Seaweed
Smoke
Smoking
Vegetables
Smoke
Full Text Links
  • JNH
Actions
Cited
CITED
export Copy
Close
Share
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
Similar articles
    DB Error: unknown error