Gut Liver.  2016 Mar;10(2):237-243. 10.5009/gnl14439.

Does Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) Plus Ascorbic Acid Induce More Mucosal Injuries than Split-Dose 4-L PEG during Bowel Preparation?

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea. neakker@gmail.com
  • 2Department of Pathology, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS
The aims of this study were to compare the bowel-cleansing efficacy, patient affinity for the preparation solution, and mucosal injury between a split dose of poly-ethylene glycol (SD-PEG) and low-volume PEG plus ascorbic acid (LV-PEG+Asc) in outpatient scheduled colonoscopies.
METHODS
Of the 319 patients, 160 were enrolled for SD-PEG, and 159 for LV-PEG+Asc. The bowel-cleansing efficacy was rated according to the Ottawa bowel preparation scale. Patient affinity for the preparation solution was assessed using a questionnaire. All mucosal injuries observed during colonoscopy were biopsied and histopathologically reviewed.
RESULTS
There was no significant difference in bowel cleansing between the groups. The LV-PEG+Asc group reported better patient acceptance and preference. There were no significant differences in the incidence or characteristics of the mucosal injuries between the two groups.
CONCLUSIONS
Compared with SD-PEG, LV-PEG+Asc exhibited equivalent bowel-cleansing efficacy and resulted in improved patient acceptance and preference. There was no significant difference in mucosal injury between SD-PEG and LV-PEG+Asc. Thus, the LV-PEG+Asc preparation could be used more effectively and easily for routine colonoscopies without risking significant mucosal injury.

Keyword

Colonoscopy; Bowel preparation; Polyethylene glycols; Ascorbic acid; Mucosal injury
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