Korean J Vasc Endovasc Surg.  2012 Aug;28(3):115-118.

Deep Vein as a Graft Conduit

Affiliations
  • 1Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Sejong General Hospital, Sejong Heart Institute, Bucheon, Korea. kilsooyie@gmail.com

Abstract

Infected vascular lesion, including aortic graft infection, is one of the most challenging fields in vascular surgery. The primary treatment objectives are to remove the infected graft material and to re-establish vascular continuity with an extra-anatomic bypass or in situ graft replacement. Despite significant progress in perioperative care and antimicrobial therapy, mortality and morbidity remain high. The great saphenous veins are gaining wide popularity as acceptable native vascular grafts, but in terms of flow capacity, their small caliber may be unsuitable for immediate replacement of arterial flow. Superficial femoral popliteal vein grafts are excellent conduits for infected aortic, peripheral arterial and central venous lesion, in terms of feasible harvesting, resistance to infection, serving immediate high postoperative flow and long-term durability. Surgery using the superficial femoral vein (SFV) graft is neither time-consuming nor dangerous. A delicate preoperative and intraoperative surgical plan is mandatory, and future studies regarding the long-term patency, appropriate clinical indication and safety issue of the SFV graft in peripheral vessel reconstruction are warranted.

Keyword

Deep vein; Graft; Vascular surgery; Bypass surgery; Infection

MeSH Terms

Femoral Vein
Glycosaminoglycans
Perioperative Care
Popliteal Vein
Saphenous Vein
Transplants
Veins
Glycosaminoglycans
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