Perinatology.  2020 Mar;31(1):1-6. 10.14734/PN.2020.31.1.1.

Recent Trend about Pregnant Women with Suspected or Confirmed Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Infection

Affiliations
  • 1DDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea.

Abstract

Since the World Health Organization declared the pandemic of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) on March 11, there has been increasing worldwide interest in it. Since then, cases of maternal infection have been reported in China, and recent cases of maternal infection and delivery have also occurred in Korea. No cure or vaccine for COVID-19 has been found, and there is no unified domestic guideline for the treatment of relatively high-risk mothers against disease. Several recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists were suggested. So far, data on COVID-19 is scarce, but it is expected to be similar to the same coronavirus infections as a middle east respiratory syndrome and severe acute respiratory syndrome and can be prepared accordingly. For COVID-19, there was no evidence of vertical transmission at delivery, and the virus was not detected in breast milk. The delivery method should be considered depending on the situation, but vaginal delivery is also possible and should be performed with complete personal protective equipment in a negative-pressure isolation room. After birth, the newborn should be separated from the mother, and the newborn should be isolated as a suspected COVID-19 infection and followed up. In the future, further research should develop clinical guidelines for maternal care for COVID-19.

Keyword

Coronavirus; Pregnant women; Infant; newborn; Parturition
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