Korean J Sports Med.  2020 Jun;38(2):110-116. 10.5763/kjsm.2020.38.2.110.

The Analysis of Global Positioning System Variables Related to Non-contact Injury in College Football Player

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Marine Sports, Pukyong National University, Busan, Korea Institute of Sport Science, Seoul, Korea
  • 2Department of Department of Sport Science, Korea Institute of Sport Science, Seoul, Korea
  • 3Research Institute for Sports Sciences, Pukyong National University, Busan, Korea

Abstract

Purpose
This study aimed to investigate the relative workload via a global positioning system (GPS) unit that was related to noncontact injuries in the lower extremities of college football player.
Methods
Data were collected from 18 players who were enrolled in a university football team using a GPS unit during competitions. The noncontact injury in the lower extremities were recorded for each competition by well-trained medical practitioners. Players’ ratio of acute to chronic workload (ACWR) of each GPS variable was calculated by dividing the most recent 1 week (acute) workload by the prior 4 weeks (chronic) workload. The ACWR in the time of player’s injury (injury-related block) was compared to the time before the injury-related block (preinjury block) and from the beginning of the data collection to the point of injury (total injured average), and the end of the data collection (total non-injured average).
Results
Eight players suffered 12 injures, indicating that an incidence rate was 13.28 injuries per 100 athlete exposures. Injured player had a higher ACWR of repeated high-intensity effort bouts (RHIE) and work-rest ratio (WRR) in the injury-related block compared to the preinjury block (F=3.151, p=0.039 and F=7.577, p=0.001, respectively). Also, they had a higher ACWR of maximal velocity (MV) in the injury-related block and total injured average compared to total non-injured average (F=5.592, p=0.004).
Conclusion
This study illustrated that the high ACWR in RHIE, WRR, and MV in the injury-related block may be related to noncontact injuries in the lower extremities of college football player. Many questions remain, but the results of this study may provide coaches and staffs in college football with useful quantitative information on preventive approach to sports-related injuries.

Keyword

College football; GPS; Injury prevention; Noncontact injury
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