J Gynecol Oncol.  2020 Apr;31(1):e31. 10.3802/jgo.2020.31.e31.

High-risk human papillomavirus testing as a primary screening for cervical cancer: position statement by the Korean Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology

Affiliations
  • 1Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea
  • 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, CHA Gangnam Medical Center, CHA University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
  • 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Institute of Women's Life Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
  • 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea
  • 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, CHA Seoul Fertility Center, CHA University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
  • 6Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
  • 7Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea
  • 8Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
  • 9Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea
  • 10Cancer Healthcare Research Branch and Center for Uterine Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea

Abstract

Based on emerging data and current knowledge regarding high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) testing as a primary screening for cervical cancer, the Korean Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology support the following scientific facts:"¢ Compared to cytology, hrHPV screening has higher sensitivity and detects more cases of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia."¢ Qualified hrHPV testing can be considered as an alternative primary screening for cervical cancer to the current cytology method."¢ The starting age of primary hrHPV screening should not be before 25 years because of possible overtreatment in this age, which has a high human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence but rarely progresses to cancer. The screening interval should be no sooner than every 3 years and no longer than every 5 years."¢ Before the introduction of hrHPV screening in Korea, research into comparative effectiveness of primary hrHPV screening for cervical cancer should be conducted to determine the appropriate HPV assay, starting age, and screening interval.

Keyword

Uterine Cervical Neoplasms; Cancer Screening Tests; Human Papillomavirus DNA Tests

MeSH Terms

Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia
Early Detection of Cancer
Gynecology*
Human Papillomavirus DNA Tests
Humans*
Korea
Mass Screening*
Medical Overuse
Methods
Obstetrics*
Prevalence
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms*
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