Asian Nurs Res.  2016 Jun;10(2):100-105. 10.1016/j.anr.2016.04.001.

Changes in Mothers' Psychosocial Perceptions of Technology-dependent Children and Adolescents at Home in Japan: Acknowledgement of Children's Autonomy

Affiliations
  • 1Division of Nursing, Faculty of Healthcare, Tokyo Healthcare University, Tokyo, Japan. kaokazaki-tky@umin.ac.jp
  • 2Division of Health Sciences and Nursing, Department of Family Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 3Division of Surgery, Department of Surgical Specialties, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 4Department of Nursing, Administration and Advanced Clinical Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 5Department of Pediatric Surgery, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.
  • 6Former the University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

PURPOSE
This research was conducted to reveal Japanese mothers' changing perceptions towards their technology-dependent children in the home care setting.
METHODS
Fourteen Japanese mothers participated in semi-structured interviews, which were analyzed using a grounded theory approach.
RESULTS
"Degree of preoccupation with the child" emerged as the category representing the mothers' perceptions towards their child. Three categories emerged that represented the progression of maternal perceptions over time: "accepting the child's conditions", "mastering the management of care in various conditions", and "considering social participation for the child".
CONCLUSIONS
First, mothers gradually accepted the conditions of their child after his/her disease and disability were known. Second, others managed technology-required care and concurrently considered the social participation of their child through daily care at home. Third, the level of preoccupation with the child was affected by the mothers' management of care and their attitude towards the social participation of their child in home care. In this study, as is widely alleged in historical recognition of Japan, mothers provided daily care almost without help from other family members. Additionally, they thought it natural and good for their children. Above all, especially in Japan, professional support for mothers are necessary so that they can take breaks from care.

Keyword

disabled children; home nursing; mothers; technology

MeSH Terms

Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
*Attitude to Health
Biomedical Technology
Caregivers
Child
Child Advocacy
Disabled Children/*psychology
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Japan
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers/*psychology
Perception
Personal Autonomy
Self-Help Devices
Young Adult
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