Saf Health Work.  2015 Sep;6(3):249-255. 10.1016/j.shaw.2015.07.005.

Does Leaders' Health (and Work-Related Experiences) Affect their Evaluation of Followers' Stress?

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Psychology, European University of Rome, Rome, Italy. gabriele.giorgi@unier.it
  • 2Department of Psychology, University of Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada.
  • 3Department of Occupational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Stressed workers suffer from severe health problems which appear to have increased. Poor leadership is especially considered a source of stress. Indeed, supervisors might perceive their subordinates to be similar to them as far as stress is concerned and this might more widespread in organizations than previously thought.
METHODS
The present research investigates the relationships between leaders' health, in terms of work-related stress, mental health, and workplace bullying and their evaluation of subordinates' stress. Five regression models were formulated to test our hypothesis. This is a cross-sectional study among 261 Italian leaders, using supervisor self-assessment and leaders' assessments of their subordinates.
RESULTS
Leaders' health was related to their evaluation of staff stress. Job demand, lack of job control, and lack of support by colleagues and supervisors evaluated in their subordinates were particularly associated with the leaders' own health.
CONCLUSION
Implications for developing healthy leaders are finally discussed.

Keyword

health; leadership; stress; workplace bullying
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