Ann Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surg.  2022 Aug;26(3):220-228. 10.14701/ahbps.22-041.

Incidence, mortality and survival of gallbladder, extrahepatic bile duct, and pancreatic cancer using Korea central cancer registry database: 1999-2019

Affiliations
  • 1Division of Cancer Registration and Surveillance, National Cancer Control Institute, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea
  • 2Center for Liver and Pancreatobiliary Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea

Abstract

Backgrounds/Aims
In Korea, pancreatic cancer and “gallbladder and extrahepatic bile duct cancer” were ranked the 8th and 9th most frequent cancers in 2019 and the 4th and 6th most common causes of cancer deaths in 2020, respectively.
Methods
This review provides national cancer statistics and secular trends of 207,521 patients with gallbladder (n = 44,178), extrahepatic bile duct (n = 61,856), and pancreatic cancer (n = 101,487) between 1999 and 2019 in Korea.
Results
The crude incidence rate in both sexes increased in the gallbladder (2.8 to 5.4 per 100,000), extrahepatic bile duct (3.6 to 9.0), and pancreatic cancer (5.5 to 15.8). The age-standardized incidence rate in both sexes significantly increased in the extrahepatic bile duct (3.7 to 4.1) and pancreatic (5.6 to 7.6) cancers but decreased in gallbladder cancer (2.9 to 2.4). The overall 5-year relative survival rate increased in the gallbladder (21.8% to 30.6%), extrahepatic bile duct (23.1% to 27.5%), and pancreatic (8.5% to 13.3%) cancers. Between 2006 and 2019, the proportion of localized or regional stages remained stable. The proportion of surgical treatment within the first 4 months after diagnosis was relatively higher in the gallbladder (42.2%) and extrahepatic bile duct (45.9%) cancers than in pancreatic cancer (22.2%).
Conclusions
The crude incidence and mortality rates of the gallbladder, extrahepatic bile duct, and pancreatic cancer are steadily increasing in Korea, and the prognosis remains poor. Early detection, active application of surgical treatment, and minimization of the proportion of untreated patients are required to improve the survival rates of these cancers.

Keyword

Neoplasms; Epidemiology; Gallbladder; Bile ducts; Pancreas

Figure

  • Fig. 1 Gallbladder cancer. (A) The annual number of new cases and cancer deaths. (B) Crude rates (CR) and age-standardized incidence rates (ASR), both sexes. (C) Secular trends of SEER stage distribution. (D) Secular trends of the first course of treatment pattern according to SEER stages. (E) Overall 5-year relative survival rates according to the year of diagnosis, age group, and SEER stages. (F) Overall 5-year relative survival rates according to the first course of treatment and SEER stages. Statistically significant (**p < 0.01).

  • Fig. 2 Extrahepatic bile duct cancer. (A) The annual number of new cases and cancer deaths. (B) Crude rates (CR) and age-standardized incidence rates (ASR), both sexes. (C) Secular trends of SEER stage distribution. (D) Secular trends of the first course of treatment pattern according to SEER stages. (E) Overall 5-year relative survival rates according to the year of diagnosis, age group, and SEER stages. (F) Overall 5-year relative survival rates according to the first course of treatment and SEER stages. Statistically significant (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01).

  • Fig. 3 Pancreatic cancer. (A) The annual number of new cases and cancer deaths. (B) Crude rates (CR) and age-standardized incidence rates (ASR), both sexes. (C) Secular trends of SEER stage distribution. (D) Secular trends of the first course of treatment pattern according to SEER stages. (E) Overall 5-year relative survival rates according to the year of diagnosis, age group, and SEER stages. (F) Overall 5-year relative survival rates according to the first course of treatment and SEER stages. Statistically significant (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01).


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