Korean J Gastroenterol.  2021 Aug;78(2):117-128. 10.4166/kjg.2021.110.

SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination for Adult Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Expert Consensus Statements by KASID

Affiliations
  • 1Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea
  • 2Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
  • 3Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea
  • 4Department of Health Promotion Medicine, Ewha Womans University Seoul Hospital, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
  • 5Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University College of Medicine, Jeju, Korea
  • 6Digestive Disease Center, CHA Bundang Hospital, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea
  • 7Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea
  • 8Center for Colorectal Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea
  • 9Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hwaseong, Korea
  • 10Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Jeonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Korea
  • 11Division of Healthcare Technology Assessment Research, National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency, Seoul, Korea
  • 12Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine , Seoul, Korea

Abstract

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the novel coronavirus, is threatening global health worldwide with unprecedented contagiousness and severity. The best strategy to overcome COVID-19 is a vaccine. Various vaccines are currently being developed, and mass vaccination is in progress. Despite the very encouraging clinical trial results of these vaccines, there is insufficient information on the safety and efficacy of vaccines for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients facing various issues. After reviewing current evidence and international guidelines, the Korean Association for the Study of Intestinal Diseases (KASID) developed an expert consensus statement on COVID-19 vaccination issues for Korean IBD patients. This expert consensus statement emphasizes that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccination be strongly recommended for IBD patients, and it is safe for IBD patients receiving immunomodulatory therapy.

Keyword

COVID-19 vaccines; SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; Inflammatory bowel diseases

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