Ann Occup Environ Med.  2020;32(1):e13. 10.35371/aoem.2020.32.e13.

Longitudinal associations between occupational stress and depressive symptoms

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Inha University Hospital, Incheon, Korea
  • 2Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
  • 3Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, School of Medicine, Inha University, Incheon, Korea
  • 4Departments of Social and Preventive Medicine and Occupational and Environmental Medicine, School of Medicine, Inha University, Incheon, Korea

Abstract

Background
Most of the studies that have examined the association between the sub-factors of occupational stress and depressive symptoms have used cross-sectional data. However, our study has longitudinally measured the occupational stress and depressive symptoms of Korean workers of a semiconductor manufacturing company across six years to intending to investigate the associations between the sub-factors of occupational stress and depressive symptoms using longitudinal data.
Methods
Data collected from the workers of a semiconductor manufacturing company. Out of 1,013 recruited workers, 405 (40.0%) completed the survey questionnaires at 3 and 6-year follow-ups. Occupational stress was measured using a shorter version of the Korean Occupational Stress Scale (KOSS), whereas depressive symptoms were assessed using the Korean version of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depressive Symptoms Scale (CES-D). The data of male and female participants independently analyzed. Longitudinal associations were analyzed using panel data analysis with fixed effects.
Results
In panel data analysis with fixed effects, job insecurity (B = 0.048, p-value = 0.004) was associated with depressive symptoms among male workers. In female workers, inadequate social support (B = 0.080, p-value < 0.001), job insecurity (B = 0.039, p-value = 0.004), lack of reward (B = 0.059, p-value = 0.004) and discomfort in occupational climate (B = 0.074, p-value < 0.001) were associated with depressive symptoms among female workers.
Conclusions
Temporal changes in the sub-factors of occupational stress were associated with changes in depressive symptoms within the same period. There was a gender difference in occupational stress sub-factors related to depressive symptoms.

Keyword

Occupational stress; Depressive symptoms; Depressive symptoms scale; Korean Occupational Stress Scale; Korea; Worker
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