Ann Rehabil Med.  2020 Jun;44(3):210-217. 10.5535/arm.19117.

Efficacy of Modified Cervical and Shoulder Retraction Exercise in Patients With Loss of Cervical Lordosis and Neck Pain

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea
  • 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Bundang, Korea
  • 3Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Abstract


Objective
To explore if the modified cervical and shoulder retraction exercise program restores cervical lordosis and reduces neck pain in patients with loss of cervical lordosis.
Methods
This study was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Eighty-three patients with loss of cervical lordosis were eligible. The eligible patients were trained to perform the modified cervical and shoulder retraction exercise program by a physiatrist, and were scheduled for a follow-up 6 to 8 weeks later to check the post-exercise pain intensity and lateral radiograph of the cervical spine in a comfortable position. The parameters of cervical alignment (4-line Cobb’s angle, posterior tangent method, and sagittal vertical axis) were measured from the lateral radiograph.
Results
Forty-seven patients were included. The mean age was 48.29±14.47 years. Cervical alignment and neck pain significantly improved after undergoing the modified cervical and shoulder retraction exercise program (p≤0.001). The upper cervical lordotic angle also significantly improved (p=0.001). In a subgroup analysis, which involved dividing the patients into two age groups (<50 years and ≥50 years), the change of the sagittal vertical axis was significantly greater in the <50 years group (p=0.021).
Conclusion
The modified cervical and shoulder retraction exercise program tends to improve cervical lordosis and neck pain in patients with loss of cervical lordosis.

Keyword

Spine; Lordosis; Neck pain; Exercise; Education
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