Korean J Intern Med.  2020 Jul;35(4):929-935. 10.3904/kjim.2018.417.

The effect of susceptibility variants, identified in never-smoking female lung cancer cases, on male smokers

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea
  • 2Lung Cancer Center, Kyungpook National University Chilgok Hospital, Daegu, Korea
  • 3Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea
  • 4Cell and Matrix Research Institute, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea
  • 5BK21 Plus KNU Biomedical Convergence Program, Department of Biomedical Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea
  • 6Biostatistics, Medical Research Collaboration Center, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea
  • 7Department of Thoracic Surgery, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea

Abstract

Background/Aims
Genome wide and candidate gene association studies have identified polymorphisms associated with the risk of lung cancer in never-smokers. This study was conducted to evaluate the association between 11 polymorphisms identified in female never smokers and the lung cancer risk in male smokers.
Methods
This study included 714 lung cancer patients and 626 healthy controls. The polymorphisms were genotyped using SEQUENOM MassARRAY iPLEX assay or Taq-Man assay.
Results
Two polymorphisms were associated with the risk of lung cancer in male smokers, as in female never smokers. Male smokers carrying the rs4975616 variant allele had a significantly decreased risk of lung cancer (in a codominant model: odds ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.61 to 0.96; p = 0.02). The rs9387478 polymorphism also reduced lung cancer risk in male smokers (in a codominant model: odds ratio, 0.85; 95% confidence interval, 0.73 to 0.997; p = 0.046). In a stratified analysis, the association between these polymorphisms and the risk of lung cancer was predominant in lighter smokers and for cases of adenocarcinoma.
Conclusions
These results suggest that a subset of polymorphisms known to be associated with the risk of lung cancer in female never smokers is also associated with the risk of lung cancer in male smokers.

Keyword

Lung neoplasms; Smokers; Non-smokers; Risk; Polymorphism
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