J Mov Disord.  2020 May;13(2):118-126. 10.14802/jmd.19066.

The Non-Motor Symptom Profile of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Neurology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India
  • 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India

Abstract


Objective
Non-motor symptoms (NMSs) significantly contribute to increased morbidity and poor quality of life in patients with parkinsonian disorders. This study aims to explore the profile of NMSs in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) using the validated Non-Motor Symptom Scale (NMSS).
Methods
Seventy-six patients with PSP were evaluated in this study. Motor symptoms and NMSs were evaluated using the PSP Rating Scale (PSPRS), Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale-III, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Hamilton Depression (HAMD) and Anxiety Rating Scales, Parkinson’s Disease Sleep Scale (PDSS) and NMSS. NMS severity and prevalence were also compared between patients with PSP-Richardson syndrome (PSP-RS) and those with PSP-parkinsonism.
Results
All subjects in this cohort reported at least 2 NMSs. The most prevalent NMSs in patients with PSP were in the domains of sleep/fatigue, mood/cognition, and sexual function. The least prevalent NMSs were in the domains of cardiovascular including falls, and perceptual problems/hallucinations. Significant correlations were observed between the NMSS scores and HAM-D, PDSS, PSPRS scores and PSPRS sub-scores. The severity of NMSs was unrelated to the duration of illness. Patients with PSP-RS reported a higher severity of drooling, altered smell/taste, depression and altered interest in sex and a higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction.
Conclusion
NMSs are commonly observed in patients with PSP, and the domains of sleep, mood and sexual function are most commonly affected. These symptoms contribute significantly to disease morbidity, and clinicians should pay adequate attention to identifying and addressing these symptoms.

Keyword

Cognitive dysfunction; Depression; Mood; Progressive supranuclear palsy; Sleep
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