Korean J Gastroenterol.  2020 Feb;75(2):103-107. 10.4166/kjg.2020.75.2.103.

Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis Associated with Sunitinib Treatment for Renal Cell Carcinoma

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, Good Gang-An Hospital, Busan, Korea.
  • 2Department of Internal Medicine, Samyook Busan Hospital, Busan, Korea.
  • 3Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea. mhnho@dau.ac.kr

Abstract

A 64-year-old man was treated with sunitinib as a first-line therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. He was given oral sunitinib in cycles of 50 mg once daily for 2 weeks followed by a week off. During the 5th week of treatment right upper quadrant pain developed, but this resolved spontaneously during the 6th week (off treatment). However, on the 8th week of treatment, he was admitted to hospital because the acute right upper quadrant pain recurred with nausea, vomiting, and fever. Acute acalculous cholecystitis was then diagnosed by ultrasonography and CT. In addition, his laboratory findings indicated disseminated intravascular coagulation. Accordingly, sunitinib therapy was discontinued and broad-spectrum antibiotics initiated. He subsequently recovered after emergent percutaneous cholecystostomy. His Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale score was 7, indicaing a probable association of the event with sunitinib. Suspicion of sunitinib-related acute cholecystitis is required, because, although uncommon, it can be life-threatening.

Keyword

Acalculous cholecystitis; Sunitinib; Renal cell carcinoma

MeSH Terms

Acalculous Cholecystitis*
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Carcinoma, Renal Cell*
Cholecystitis, Acute
Cholecystostomy
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Fever
Humans
Middle Aged
Nausea
Ultrasonography
Vomiting
Anti-Bacterial Agents
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