Immune Netw.  2019 Dec;19(6):e42. 10.4110/in.2019.19.e42.

Prenatal Exposure to Lead and Chromium is Associated with IL-13 Levels in Umbilical Cord Blood and Severity of Atopic Dermatitis: COCOA Study

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. kmaped@skku.edu
  • 2Environmental Health Center for Atopic Diseases, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
  • 3Statistics and Data Center, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
  • 4Heavy Metal Exposure Environmental Health Center, Dong-A University, Busan, Korea.
  • 5Department of Preventive Medicine, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.
  • 6Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Human Ecology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.
  • 7Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 8Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 9Department of Pediatrics, CHA Gangnam Medical Center, CHA University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 10Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 11Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Integrative Medicine Center, Korea University Medical College, Seoul, Korea.
  • 12Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, CHA Gangnam Medical Center, CHA University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 13Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul, Korea.
  • 14Department of Pediatrics, Childhood Asthma Atopy Center, Environmental Health Center, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. sjhong@amc.seoul.kr

Abstract

There have been few studies investigating the association between atopic dermatitis (AD) and prenatal exposure to heavy metals. We aimed to evaluate whether prenatal exposure to heavy metals is associated with the development or severity of AD in a birth cohort study. A total of 331 subjects were followed from birth for a median duration of 60.0 months. The presence and severity of AD were evaluated at ages 6 and 12 months, and regularly once a year thereafter. The concentrations of lead, mercury, chromium, and cadmium in umbilical cord blood were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) were isolated and stimulated for analysis of cytokine production using ELISA. Heavy metal levels in cord blood were not associated with the development of AD until 24 months of age. However, a positive correlation was observed between the duration of AD and lead levels in cord blood (p=0.002). AD severity was also positively associated with chromium concentrations in cord blood (p=0.037), while cord blood levels of lead, mercury, and cadmium were not significantly associated with AD severity (p=0.562, p=0.054, and p=0.055, respectively). Interleukin-13 production in CBMCs was positively related with lead and chromium levels in cord blood (p=0.021 and p=0.015, respectively). Prenatal exposure to lead and chromium is associated with the persistence and severity of AD, and the immune reaction toward a Th2 polarization.

Keyword

Dermatitis, atopic; Cohort studies; Chromium; Fetal blood; Interleukin-13
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