Arch Plast Surg.  2019 Sep;46(5):414-420. 10.5999/aps.2019.00206.

Clinical factors in patients with congenital muscular torticollis treated with surgical resection

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, National Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
  • 2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Ajou University Hospital, Suwon, Korea. mpark0601@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is characterized by persistent head tilt toward the affected side. No consensus exists regarding the cause of this disorder. In this study, we analyzed various clinical factors in patients with CMT who were treated with surgical release. This analysis enabled us to identify potential causative factors of CMT and to establish a basis for surgical interventions.
METHODS
In total, 584 patients who underwent surgical intervention for CMT from October 2007 to December 2016 were included in this study. Their demographic characteristics, birth-related factors, and clinical features were analyzed.
RESULTS
Data from 525 patients were analyzed in this study after exclusion of those with insufficient information. Before birth, 31 patients (5.9%) were diagnosed with oligohydramnios, and 87 (16.6%) had a breech presentation. Seven (1.3%) cases of clavicle fracture and two (0.4%) cases of cephalohematoma were noted at birth. Before surgery, 397 patients (75.6%) underwent physiotherapy and 128 patients (24.4%) did not. The duration of physiotherapy ranged from 1 to 50 months (average, 6 months).
CONCLUSIONS
Our study shows that 16.6% of the CMT patients presented in the breech position, which is a much higher rate than that observed in the general population (3%-4%). We hypothesize that being in the breech position as a fetus appears to exert a significant influence on shortening and fibrosis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

Keyword

Torticollis; Surgical release; Retrospective studies

MeSH Terms

Breech Presentation
Clavicle
Consensus
Female
Fetus
Fibrosis
Head
Humans
Oligohydramnios
Parturition
Pregnancy
Retrospective Studies
Torticollis*
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