Ann Dermatol.  2019 Aug;31(4):403-413. 10.5021/ad.2019.31.4.403.

Polydeoxyribonucleotides Improve Diabetic Wound Healing in Mouse Animal Model for Experimental Validation

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Dermatology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. beomjoon@unitel.co.kr
  • 2Department of Medicine, Graduate School, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Wound healing mechanisms is believed to have effects similar to wound healing disorders in diabetic patients, including abnormal inflammatory cells, angiogenesis disorders, and reduced collagen synthesis. Therefore, reestablishment of structural and promoted angiogenesis could be beneficial to promote wound healing process.
OBJECTIVE
Therefore, we investigated whether the polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) that was self-production in Korea, could be useful as an intradermal injection for promoting wound healing. Also, we validate for wound healing effect of PDRN using healing-impaired (db/db) mice.
METHODS
In this study, we confirmed the effects of PDRN by creating wound models in in vitro and in vivo model. Using an in vitro wound healing assay, we observed that PDRN stimulated closure of wounded monolayers of human fibroblast cells. PDRN (8.25 mg/ml) or phosphate-buffered saline (0.9% NaCl) was injected once daily into the dermis adjacent to the wound for 12 days after skin injury.
RESULTS
Time course observations revealed that mice treated with PDRN showed accelerated wound closure and epidermal and dermal regeneration, enhanced angiogenesis. The wound area and depth decreased at 3, 6, 9, and 12 days after skin injury. Histological evaluation showed an increase of vascular endothelial growth factor, CD31, and collagen fibers in the PDRN group compared with the control group, indicating that PDRN was effective in the treatment of delayed wound healing caused by diabetes.
CONCLUSION
This study suggests that our PDRN has a wound healing effect in transgenic animal models with cells and diabetes through angiogenesis.

Keyword

CD31; Diabetes mouse model; Polyribonucleotide; Vascular endothelial growth factor A; Wound healing

MeSH Terms

Animals
Animals*
Animals, Genetically Modified
Collagen
Dermis
Fibroblasts
Humans
In Vitro Techniques
Injections, Intradermal
Korea
Mice*
Models, Animal*
Polydeoxyribonucleotides*
Regeneration
Skin
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Wound Healing*
Wounds and Injuries*
Collagen
Polydeoxyribonucleotides
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
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