J Korean Med Sci.  2018 Feb;33(6):e45. 10.3346/jkms.2018.33.e45.

Etiology of Invasive Bacterial Infections in Immunocompetent Children in Korea (2006–2010): a Retrospective Multicenter Study

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Children's Hospital, Seoul, Korea. hoanlee@snu.ac.kr
  • 2Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 3Department of Pediatrics, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.
  • 4Department of Pediatrics, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
  • 5Department of Pediatrics, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
  • 6Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Severance Children's Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
  • 7Department of Pediatrics, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 8Department of Pediatrics, Eulji University School of Medicine, Eulji University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
  • 9Department of Pediatrics, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 10Department of Pediatrics, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 11Department of Pediatrics, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea.
  • 12Department of Pediatrics, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Korea.
  • 13Department of Pediatrics, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang, Korea.
  • 14Department of Pediatrics, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Korea.
  • 15Department of Pediatrics, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, St. Vincent's Hospital, Suwon, Korea.
  • 16Department of Pediatrics, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea.
  • 17Department of Pediatrics, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, Korea.
  • 18Department of Pediatrics, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea.
  • 19Department of Pediatrics, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.
  • 20Department of Pediatrics, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea.
  • 21Department of Pediatrics, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Busan, Korea.
  • 22Department of Pediatrics, Fatima Hospital, Changwon, Korea.
  • 23Department of Pediatrics, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, Korea.
  • 24Department of Pediatrics, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Invasive bacterial infections in apparently immunocompetent children were retrospectively analyzed to figure causative bacterial organisms in Korea.
METHODS
A total of 947 cases from 25 university hospitals were identified from 2006 to 2010 as a continuance of a previous 10-year period study from 1996 to 2005.
RESULTS
Escherichia coli (41.3%), Streptococcus agalactiae (27.7%), and Staphylococcus aureus (27.1%) were the most common pathogens in infants < 3 months of age. S. agalactiae was the most prevalent cause of meningitis and pneumonia and E. coli was the major cause of bacteremia without localizing signs in this group. In children 3 to 59 months of age, Streptococcus pneumoniae (54.2%), S. aureus (20.5%), and Salmonella spp. (14.4%) were the most common pathogens. S. pneumoniae was the leading cause of pneumonia (86.0%), meningitis (65.0%), and bacteremia without localizing signs (49.0%) in this group. In children ≥ 5 years of age, S. aureus (62.8%) was the predominant pathogen, followed by Salmonella species (12.4%) and S. pneumoniae (11.5%). Salmonella species (43.0%) was the most common cause of bacteremia without localizing signs in this group. The relative proportion of S. aureus increased significantly over the 15-year period (1996-2010) in children ≥ 3 months of age (P < 0.001), while that of Haemophilus influenzae decreased significantly in both < 3 months of age group (P = 0.036) and ≥ 3 months of age groups (P < 0.001).
CONCLUSION
S. agalactiae, E. coli, S. pneumoniae, and S. aureus are common etiologic agents of invasive bacterial infections in Korean children.

Keyword

Bacterial Infections; Epidemiology; Streptococcus agalactiae; Escherichia coli; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Staphylococcus aureus
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