J Korean Med Sci.  2018 Nov;33(46):e289. 10.3346/jkms.2018.33.e289.

The Prevalence of Cerebral Microbleeds in Non-Demented Parkinson's Disease Patients

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Neurology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea.
  • 2Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea.
  • 3Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Korea. jongmin1@snu.ac.kr
  • 4Department of Neurology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.
  • 5Department of Neurology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 6Department of Neurology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND
Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and cognitive dysfunction among patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether CMBs themselves are associated with PD is to be elucidated.
METHODS
We analyzed the presence of CMBs using 3-Tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging in non-demented patients with PD and in age-, sex-, and hypertension-matched control subjects. PD patients were classified according to their motor subtypes: tremor-dominant, intermediate, and postural instability-gait disturbance (PIGD). Other cerebrovascular risk factors and small vessel disease (SVD) burdens were also evaluated.
RESULTS
Two-hundred and five patients with PD and 205 control subjects were included. The prevalence of CMBs was higher in PD patients than in controls (16.1% vs. 8.8%; odds ratio [OR], 2.126; P = 0.019); CMBs in the lobar area showed a significant difference between PD patients and controls (11.7% vs. 5.9%; OR, 2.234; P = 0.032). According to the motor subtype, CMBs in those with PIGD type showed significant difference from controls with respect to the overall brain area (21.1% vs. 8.9%; OR, 2.759; P = 0.010) and lobar area (14.6% vs. 4.9%; OR, 3.336; P = 0.016). Among PD patients, those with CMBs had higher age and more evidence of SVDs than those without CMBs.
CONCLUSION
We found that CMBs are more frequent in PD patients than in controls, especially in those with the PIGD subtype and CMBs on the lobar area. Further study investigating the pathogenetic significance of CMBs is required.

Keyword

Cerebral Microbleeds; Parkinson's Disease; Synucleinopathy; Amyloid Angiopathy
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