Korean J Sports Med.  2017 Jun;35(1):48-56. 10.5763/kjsm.2017.35.1.48.

Association of Occupational Stress and Cardiorespiratory Fitness with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Office Workers

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Sport Science, University of Seoul, Seoul, Korea. syjae@uos.ac.kr

Abstract

Occupational stress is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), while cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is associated with decreased risk of CVD. We tested the hypothesis that high occupational stress would be associated with increased cardiovascular risk profiles, but CRF may attenuate this association. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis in 70 healthy office workers (male, 28; female, 42; mean age, 38±8 years). Occupational stress was assessed using a validated self-reported questionnaire. Total CVD risk score (sum of z-standardized residuals) was calculated by blood pressure, body mass index, lipid profiles and glucose. CRF was estimated by predicted equation during maximal treadmill exercise test. The results showed that an interpersonal conflict as an index of occupational stress was positively correlated with cardiovascular risk score (r=0.43, p<0.05). In contrast, Higher CRF was associated with lower occupational climate (r=−0.25, p<0.05) and total occupational stress score (r=−0.29, p<0.05). The total CVD risk score was similar between group with high stress but high fitness and group with low stress and high fitness (p>0.05). Furthermore, Participants with high stress but high CRF had lower cardiovascular risk score than those with high stress but low CRF (p<0.05). In conclusion, occupational stress is associated with an increased CVD risk, but CRF attenuated this association in office worker with increased occupational stress.

Keyword

Stress; Cardiovascular disease; Cardiorespiratory fitness
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