J Vet Sci.  2016 Mar;17(1):13-20. 10.4142/jvs.2016.17.1.13.

Reduction of adult hippocampal neurogenesis is amplified by aluminum exposure in a model of type 2 diabetes

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea. ysyoon@snu.ac.kr
  • 2BK21 PLUS Program for Creative Veterinary Science Research, and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea.
  • 3Department of Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 24341, Korea.
  • 4Korea Mouse Phenotyping Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Korea.

Abstract

In this study, we investigated the effects of chronic aluminum (Al) exposure for 10 weeks on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampus of type 2 diabetic rats. Six-week-old Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) and Zucker lean control (ZLC) rats were selected and randomly divided into Al- and non-Al-groups. Al was administered via drinking water for 10 weeks, after which the animals were sacrificed at 16 weeks of age. ZDF rats in both Al- and non-Al-groups showed increases in body weight and blood glucose levels compared to ZLC rats. Al exposure did not significantly affect body weight, blood glucose levels or pancreatic β-cells and morphology of the pancreas in either ZLC or ZDF rats. However, exposure to Al reduced cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in both ZLC and ZDF rats. Exposure to Al resulted in poor development of the dendritic processes of neuroblasts in both ZLC and ZDF rats. Furthermore, onset and continuation of diabetes reduced cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, and Al exposure amplified reduction of these parameters. These results suggest that Al exposure via drinking water aggravates the impairment in hippocampal neurogenesis that is typically observed in type 2 diabetic animals.

Keyword

Zucker diabetic fatty rat; aluminum; diabetes; drinking water; neurogenesis
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