J Mov Disord.  2016 Sep;9(3):136-143. 10.14802/jmd.16029.

Applications of CRISPR/Cas9 for Gene Editing in Hereditary Movement Disorders

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Neurology, Neuroscience Research Center, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea. kimmanho@snu.ac.kr
  • 2Protein Metabolism Medical Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

Gene therapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating hereditary movement disorders, including hereditary ataxia, dystonia, Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Genome editing is a type of genetic engineering in which DNA is inserted, deleted or replaced in the genome using modified nucleases. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/CRISPR associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) has been used as an essential tool in biotechnology. Cas9 is an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease enzyme that was originally associated with the adaptive immune system of Streptococcus pyogenes and is now being utilized as a genome editing tool to induce double strand breaks in DNA. CRISPR/Cas9 has advantages in terms of clinical applicability over other genome editing technologies such as zinc-finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases because of easy in vivo delivery. Here, we review and discuss the applicability of CRISPR/Cas9 to preclinical studies or gene therapy in hereditary movement disorders.

Keyword

CRISPR/Cas9; gene editing; gene therapy; hereditary movement disorders

MeSH Terms

Biotechnology
Deoxyribonuclease I
DNA
Dystonia
Genetic Engineering
Genetic Therapy
Genome
Huntington Disease
Immune System
Movement Disorders*
Parkinson Disease
Spinocerebellar Degenerations
Streptococcus pyogenes
DNA
Deoxyribonuclease I
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