J Korean Acad Oral Health.  2016 Jun;40(2):85-91. 10.11149/jkaoh.2016.40.2.85.

Association of the number of existing permanent teeth with the intake of macronutrients and macrominerals in adults aged 55-84 years based on the 5th KNHNES (2010-2012)

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Preventive & Community Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Korea. jbomkim@pusan.ac.kr
  • 2BK21 PLUS Project, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan, Korea.
  • 3Department of Dental Hygiene, College of Health Sciences, Cheongju University, Cheongju, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze the association between energy sources, fiber and mineral intake, and the number of existing permanent teeth in adults aged 55-84 years from the 5th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHNES) (2010-2012).
METHODS
The subjects included 6,763 people who received oral examinations and answered questions on household income, smoking status and diet. We estimated the number of existing permanent teeth and food intake according to age group, sex, household income, and smoking status. A complex samples general linear model was applied to analyze the effect of nutrient intake on the number of existing permanent teeth adjusted for sex, household income, smoking status, and food intake. We calculated the mean intake of nutrients related to the number of existing permanent teeth in each tooth group.
RESULTS
The reduction in the number of existing permanent teeth correlated with an increased carbohydrate intake and a decreased potassium intake. The carbohydrate intake was lower in subjects with 25 or more teeth than that in subjects with 9 or less teeth. Potassium intake was higher in subjects with 20 or more teeth.
CONCLUSIONS
The number of existing permanent teeth showed a negative correlation with carbohydrate intake and a positive correlation with potassium intake. We should reduce carbohydrate intake and increased potassium intake from fruits and vegetables to prevent systemic disease caused by tooth loss.

Keyword

Carbohydrate; Mineral; Nutrient; Permanent teeth; Potassium
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