Saf Health Work.  2010 Dec;1(2):134-139.

Occupational Lung Cancer Surveillance in South Korea, 2006-2009

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Occupational and Environment Medicine, Inha University Hospital, Incheon, Korea. ekeeper@inha.ac.kr
  • 2Department of Internal Medicine, Inha University Hospital, Incheon, Korea.
  • 3Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
  • 4Department of Occupational and Environment Medicine, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun, Korea.
  • 5Department of Internal Medicine, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun, Korea.
  • 6Department of Occupational and Environment Medicine, Wonju Christian Hospital, Wonju, Korea.
  • 7Department of Internal Medicine, Wonju Christian Hospital, Wonju, Korea.
  • 8Department of Occupational and Environment Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
  • 9Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook University Hospital, Daegu, Korea.
  • 10Department of Occupational and Environment Medicine, Eulgi University Hospital, Daejeon, Korea.
  • 11Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Dong-A University Hospital, Busan, Korea.
  • 12Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, College of Medicine, Koshin University Hospital, Busan, Korea.
  • 13Department of Occupational and Environment Medicine, Catholic University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
  • 14Department of Occupational and Environment Medicine, Inje University Paik Hospital, Busan, Korea.
  • 15Department of Occupational and Environment Medicine, Busan University Hospital, Busan, Korea.
  • 16Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The lung cancer mortality in Korea has increased remarkably during the last 20 years, and has been the first leading cause of cancer-related deaths since 2000. The aim of the current study was to examine the time trends of occupational lung cancer and carcinogens exposure during the period 2006-2009 in South Korea, by assessing the proportion of occupational burden.
METHODS
We defined occupational lung cancer for surveillance, and developed a reporting protocol and reporting website for the surveillance of occupational lung cancer. The study patients were chosen from 9 participating university hospitals in the following 7 areas: Seoul, Incheon, Wonju, Daejeon, Daegu, Busan, and Gwangju.
RESULTS
The combined proportion of definite and probable occupational lung cancer among all lung cancers investigated in this study was 10.0%, 8.6%, 10.7%, and 15.8% in the years 2006 to 2009, respectively, with an average of 11.7% over the four-year study period. The main carcinogens were asbestos, crystalline silica, radon, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), diesel exhaust particles, chromium, and nickel.
CONCLUSION
We estimated that about 11.7% of the incident lung cancer was preventable. This reveals the potential to considerably reduce lung cancer by intervention in occupational fields.

Keyword

Occupational cancer; Lung cancer; Surveillance; Occupational disease burden; Asbestos
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