Nutr Res Pract.  2015 Feb;9(1):92-98. 10.4162/nrp.2015.9.1.92.

Food allergy knowledge, perception of food allergy labeling, and level of dietary practice: A comparison between children with and without food allergy experience

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Nutrition Education, Graduate School of Education, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701, Korea.
  • 2Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Dankook University, 126, Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu,Yongin, Gyeonggi-do, 448-701 Korea. hjc10@dankook.ac.kr

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES
The prevalence of food allergies in Korean children aged 6 to 12 years increased from 10.9% in 1995 to 12.6% in 2012 according to nationwide population studies. Treatment for food allergies is avoidance of allergenic-related foods and epinephrine auto-injector (EPI) for accidental allergic reactions. This study compared knowledge and perception of food allergy labeling and dietary practices of students.
SUBJECTS/METHODS
The study was conducted with the fourth to sixth grade students from an elementary school in Yongin. A total of 437 response rate (95%) questionnaires were collected and statistically analyzed.
RESULTS
The prevalence of food allergy among respondents was 19.7%, and the most common food allergy-related symptoms were urticaria, followed by itching, vomiting and nausea. Food allergens, other than 12 statutory food allergens, included cheese, cucumber, kiwi, melon, clam, green tea, walnut, grape, apricot and pineapple. Children with and without food allergy experience had a similar level of knowledge on food allergies. Children with food allergy experience thought that food allergy-related labeling on school menus was not clear or informative.
CONCLUSION
To understand food allergies and prevent allergic reactions to school foodservice among children, schools must provide more concrete and customized food allergy education.

Keyword

Elementary students; food allergy; labeling; dietary practice

MeSH Terms

Allergens
Ananas
Bivalvia
Cheese
Child*
Cucurbitaceae
Education
Epinephrine
Food Hypersensitivity*
Gyeonggi-do
Humans
Hypersensitivity
Juglans
Nausea
Prevalence
Prunus armeniaca
Pruritus
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tea
Urticaria
Vitis
Vomiting
Allergens
Epinephrine
Tea
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