Korean J Epidemiol.  2005 Jun;27(1):26-36.

Brucellosis: An Overview

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Dongguk University. wisewine@dongguk.ac.kr
  • 2Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Yonsei University.
  • 3Department of Infectious Disease, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University.
  • 4Laboratory of Rickettsia, Korea Center for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • 5Bacteriology & Parasitology Division, National Veterinary Research & Quarantine Service.

Abstract

Brucellosis is zoonotic disease of worldwide distribution and still remains endemic in some developing countries. The main pathogenic species worldwide are B. abortus, responsible for bovine brucellosis, B. melitensis. The B. abortus is most common in Korea. Each Brucella spp. has a preferred natural host that serves as a reservoir of infection. The incubation period varies between 5 and 60 days, and Brucella infection may be asymptomatic or symptomatic. The majority of patients complained of fever (undulating fever), sweats, malaise, anorexia, and arthralgia. The diagnosis of brucellosis requires the isolation of Brucella from blood or body tissues, or the combination of suggestive clinical presentation and positive serology. There were first patients in 2002, thereafter 16 patients in 2003, and 47 patients in 2004, the human brucellosis are increasing more gradually in Korea. Brucellosis is an occupational risk for farmers, veterinarians, and abattoir workers. The main sources of Brucella are infected animals or their products, such as milk, blood, carcasses, and abortion products. Routes of transmission of the infection to humans include direct contact with infected animals and their secretions through cuts and abrasions in the skin, by way of infected aerosols inhaled or via the ingestion of unpasteurized dairy products. A combination of doxycycline and streptomycin has been used widely in brucellosis. Prevention of brucellosis in human still depends on the eradication or control of the disease in animal hosts, the exercise of hygienic precautions to limit exposure to infection through occupational activities and the effective heating of dairy products, and other potentially contaminated foods. Also, physicians and veterinarians must be concerned about specific environments and clinical patterns of brucellosis.

Keyword

Brucellosis; Prevention; Zoonoses

MeSH Terms

Abattoirs
Aerosols
Animals
Anorexia
Arthralgia
Brucella
Brucellosis*
Brucellosis, Bovine
Cattle
Dairy Products
Developing Countries
Diagnosis
Doxycycline
Eating
Fever
Heating
Hot Temperature
Humans
Korea
Milk
Skin
Streptomycin
Sweat
Veterinarians
Zoonoses
Aerosols
Doxycycline
Streptomycin
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