Korean Circ J.  2009 Aug;39(8):297-303. 10.4070/kcj.2009.39.8.297.

Differences in Clinical Outcomes Between Patients With ST-Elevation Versus Non-ST-Elevation Acute Myocardial Infarction in Korea

Affiliations
  • 1The Heart Research Center of Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju, Korea. myungho@chollian.net

Abstract

In Korea, the incidence of acute myocardial infarction has been increasing rapidly. Twelve-month clinical outcomes for 13,133 patients with acute myocardial infarction enrolled in the nationwide prospective Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry study were analyzed according to the presence or absence of ST-segment elevation. Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) were younger, more likely to be men and smokers, and had poorer left ventricular function with a higher incidence of cardiac death compared to patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). NSTEMI patients had a higher prevalence of 3-vessel and left main coronary artery disease with complex lesions, and were more likely to have co-morbidities. The in-hospital and 1-month survival rates were higher in NSTEMI patients than in STEMI patients. However, 12-month survival rates was not different between the two groups. In conclusion, NSTEMI patients have worse clinical outcomes than STEMI patients, and therefore should be treated more intensively during clinical follow-up.

Keyword

Myocardial infarction; Coronary artery disease; Prognosis

MeSH Terms

Coronary Artery Disease
Death
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Korea
Male
Myocardial Infarction
Prevalence
Prognosis
Survival Rate
Ventricular Function, Left

Figure

  • Fig. 1 In-hospital survival rate was higher in non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients than in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients.

  • Fig. 2 One-month survival rate was higher in non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients than in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. (STEMI) patients.

  • Fig. 3 Twelve-month survival rates were not different between non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients.

  • Fig. 4 Post-discharge survival at 12 months after implantation of Cypher and Taxus stents was not different between the two drug-eluting stents.


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