J Rhinol.  2009 May;16(1):49-53.

Effects of the General Anesthesia and the Rose Position on the Change of the Inferior Turbinate Size

Affiliations
  • 1Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. entljh@hanmir.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES
Enlargement of the inferior turbinates can be caused by allergic rhinitis, vasomotor rhinitis, or emotional responses. However, the effects of general anesthesia and the Rose position on the enlargement of the turbinates are unknown. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of general anesthesia and the Rose position on the size of the inferior turbinates and nasal passage.
MATERIALS AND METHODS
Fifty patients undergoing tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy or snoring surgery without nasal pathology from February, 2007 to July, 2007 at a university hospital were included in the study. The size of the inferior turbinates was measured under the following conditions:1) pre-anesthesia in the supine position;2) post-anesthesia in the supine position;3) post- anesthesia, lying in the Rose position, and 4) at the end of the operation 30 to 50 minutes after anesthesia, with endoscopic nasal photographs. Using an acoustic rhinometry, the minimal cross-sectional area of the nasal cavity was, during conditions one and four, listed above, simultaneously.
RESULTS
The size of the inferior turbinates was increased statistically in condition three, post-anesthesia, lying in the Rose position, and condition four, at the end of surgery 30 to 50 minutes after anesthesia, compared to condition one, pre-anesthesia lying in the supine position. In addition, the minimal cross-sectional area of the nasal cavity was decreased in condition one compared to condition four.
CONCLUSION
The size of the inferior turbinates was influenced by general anesthesia and the Rose position, presumably due to engorgement of the venous sinuses and/or mucosal edema.

Keyword

Turbinte enlargement; general anesthesia; Rose position; Posture
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