J Korean Ophthalmol Soc.  1986 Aug;27(4):657-666.

Two Cases of Monochromatic Green Argon Laser Photocoagulation for Choroidal Neovascular Membrane in High Myopes

Abstract

High myopia, often called malignant, pathologic or degenerative myopia, involves a progressive elongation of globe, accompanied by degenerative changes of the retina and choroid. Continued stretching and degeneration of the choroid causes eyes with severe myopia to develop breaks in Bruch's membrane which, called lacquer cracks, and permits neovascular proliferation from the choriocapillaris into the subretinal pigment epithelial space. Neovascularization associated with severe myopia deteriorates central visual acuity due to exudation and/or hemorrhage. Laser photocoagulation therapy is useful in treating neovascular membrane outside the foveal avascular zone or extending to the edge of the perifoveal capillary network. We have evaluated three patients with macular hemorrhage which associated with high myopic choroidal degeneration. Subretinal neovascular membrane was detected by fluorecein angiography and was treated with monochromatic Argon green laser photocoagulation in two patients indicated. The visual acuities were improved. But one patient who had macular hemorrhage involving both foveas could not be treated with laser photocoagulation. Then his visual acuity severly decreased. We give our experiences with the review of other papers in this report.


MeSH Terms

Angiography
Argon*
Bruch Membrane
Capillaries
Choroid*
Hemorrhage
Humans
Lacquer
Light Coagulation*
Membranes*
Myopia
Myopia, Degenerative
Retina
Visual Acuity
Argon
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