J Korean Soc Plast Reconstr Surg.  1999 May;26(3):414-420.

Correction of Deviated Nose Associated with High Septal Deformity with Spreader Graft

Abstract

High septal deformities exert pressure on upper lateral cartilages and nasal bones and cause external deviation of the nose. However, detection of high septal deformities causing deviated noses is very difficult if a detailed intranasal examination is not performed. As well, the high septal border is a difficult area to approach via the endonasal rhinoplasty and is the weakest portion in the septum resulting in much difficulty in correcting deformities and in frequent later recurrence of deviation secondary to the healing process. In order to solve the above problems in 33 cases of deviated nose associated with high septal deformities, the authors evaluated deformities in the high septal border after separation of the septum from upper lateral cartilages and nasal bones. The high septal border is centralized by scoring after resection of the mid or lower-septal portion. And spreader grafts were applied to the convex sides of deviated septal borders to stabilize the high septal border and to prevent long-term recurrence of deviation. Also, to balance the traction force of side walls, the length of both upper lateral cartilages and nasal bones were equalized by resection in the longer side and grafting in the shorter side. Clinical follow-up ranged from 3 to 31 months. There was no surgical or septal complication. Also, there was no incomplete correction, recurrence of deviation, or compromized nasal support. All patients except 2 were satisfied with the aesthetic and functional results. We found that separation of septum from side walls allows detection and correction of higher septal deformities and that spreader graft allows long-term support and prevents later recurrence of deviation.

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