J Vet Sci.  2008 Sep;9(3):219-231. 10.4142/jvs.2008.9.3.219.

All blood, No stool: enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection

Affiliations
  • 1Division of Molecular and Life Science, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791, Korea.
  • 2Department of Microbiology, Molecular Biology, and Biochemistry, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, 83844-3052, USA. cbohach@uidaho.edu

Abstract

Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 is a pathotype of diarrheagenic E. coli that produces one or more Shiga toxins, forms a characteristic histopathology described as attaching and effacing lesions, and possesses the large virulence plasmid pO157. The bacterium is recognized worldwide, especially in developed countries, as an emerging food-borne bacterial pathogen, which causes disease in humans and in some animals. Healthy cattle are the principal and natural reservoir of E. coli O157:H7, and most disease outbreaks are, therefore, due to consumption of fecally contaminated bovine foods or dairy products. In this review, we provide a general overview of E. coli O157:H7 infection, especially focusing on the bacterial characteristics rather than on the host responses during infection.

Keyword

enterohemorrhagic; Escherichia coli; O157:H7

MeSH Terms

Animals
Cattle
Cattle Diseases/blood/epidemiology
Developing Countries
*Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli
Escherichia coli Infections/blood/*epidemiology/veterinary
*Escherichia coli O157/genetics/pathogenicity
Feces/microbiology
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome/blood/epidemiology/veterinary
Operon
Shiga Toxins/analysis
Shigella dysenteriae
Virulence

Cited by  1 articles

Pathogenic and phylogenetic characteristics of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolates from retail meats in South Korea
June Bong Lee, Dalmuri Han, Hyung Tae Lee, Seon Mi Wi, Jeong Hoon Park, Jung-woo Jo, Young-Jae Cho, Tae-Wook Hahn, Sunjin Lee, Byunghak Kang, Hyo Sun Kwak, Jonghyun Kim, Jang Won Yoon
J Vet Sci. 2018;19(2):251-259.    doi: 10.4142/jvs.2018.19.2.251.


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