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Paip1 Indicated Poor Prognosis in Cervical Cancer and Promoted Cervical Carcinogenesis

Li N, Piao J, Wang X, Kim KY, Bae JY, Ren X, Lin Z

PURPOSE: This study was aimed to investigate the role of poly(A)-binding protein-interacting protein 1 (Paip1) in cervical carcinogenesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The expression of Paip1 in normal cervical epithelial tissues and...
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Human papillomavirus genotype-specific risk in cervical carcinogenesis

So KA, Lee IH, Lee KH, Hong SR, Kim YJ, Seo HH, Kim TJ

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) infections for the spectrum of cervical carcinogenesis and the distribution of HPV types according to age and different cervical lesions METHODS:...
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BRCA1 and Breast Cancer: a Review of the Underlying Mechanisms Resulting in the Tissue-Specific Tumorigenesis in Mutation Carriers

Semmler L, Reiter-Brennan C, Klein A

Since the first cloning of BRCA1 in 1994, many of its cellular interactions have been elucidated. However, its highly specific role in tumorigenesis in the breast tissue—carriers of BRCA1 mutations...
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Disruption of the Tff1 gene in mice using CRISPR/Cas9 promotes body weight reduction and gastric tumorigenesis

Kim H, Jeong H, Cho Y, Lee J, Nam KT, Lee HW

Trefoil factor 1 (TFF1, also known as pS2) is strongly expressed in the gastrointestinal mucosa and plays a critical role in the differentiation of gastric glands. Since approximately 50% of...
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LncRNA XLOC_006390 facilitates cervical cancer tumorigenesis and metastasis as a ceRNA against miR-331-3p and miR-338-3p

Luan X, Wang Y

OBJECTIVE: Cervical cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors. Our previous results showed that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) XLOC_006390 plays an important role in cervical cancer. In this...
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The Effect of Microbiota on Colon Carcinogenesis

Yoon K, Kim N

Although genetic background is known to contribute to colon carcinogenesis, the exact etiology of the disease remains elusive. The organ’s extensive interaction with microbes necessitated research on the role of...
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Necessity of Epigenetic Epidemiology Studies on the Carcinogenesis of Lung Cancer in Never Smokers

Bae JM

Based on epidemiological and genomic characteristics, lung cancer in never smokers (LCNS) is a different disease from lung cancer in smokers. Based on current research, the main risk factor for...
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Benzodiazepine-Associated Carcinogenesis: Focus on Lorazepam-Associated Cancer Biomarker Changes in Overweight Individuals

Ku SC, Ho PS, Tseng YT, Yeh TC, Cheng SL, Liang CS

OBJECTIVE: Cellular, animal, and human epidemiological studies suggested that benzodiazepines increase the risk of cancer and cancer mortality. Obesity is also clearly linked to carcinogenesis. However, no human studies have...
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Long Noncoding RNA HEIH Promotes Colorectal Cancer Tumorigenesis via Counteracting miR-939-Mediated Transcriptional Repression of Bcl-xL

Cui C, Zhai D, Cai L, Duan Q, Xie L, Yu J

PURPOSE: Studies have found that long noncoding RNA HEIH (lncRNA-HEIH) is upregulated and facilitates hepatocellular carcinoma tumor growth. However, its clinical significances, roles, and action mechanism in colorectal cancer (CRC)...
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Serrated neoplasia pathway as an alternative route of colorectal cancer carcinogenesis

Kim SY, Kim TI

In the past two decades, besides conventional adenoma pathway, a subset of colonic lesions, including hyperplastic polyps, sessile serrated adenoma/polyps, and traditional serrated adenomas have been suggested as precancerous lesions...
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Impact of microbiota in colorectal carcinogenesis: lessons from experimental models

Yu LC, Wei SC, Ni YH

A role of gut microbiota in colorectal cancer (CRC) growth was first suggested in germ-free rats almost 50 years ago, and the existence of disease-associated bacteria (termed pathobionts) had becoming...
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Changes in Gastric Microbiota during Gastric Carcinogenesis

Lee SY

After World War II, the incidence of gastric cancer decreased rapidly in most of the developed countries; however, it remained high in countries where secondary prevention of gastric cancer is...
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The Role of MicroRNAs in Oncogenesis and Progression of Prostate Cancer

Kim WT, Yun SJ, Kim WJ

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that target mRNA to reduce gene and protein expression by repressing their targets' translation or inducing mRNA degradation. They play fundamental roles in various...
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Inhibition of TNFα-interacting protein α (Tipα)-associated gastric carcinogenesis by BTG2(/TIS21) via downregulating cytoplasmic nucleolin expression

Devanand P, Oya Y, Sundaramoorthy S, Song KY, Watanabe T, Kobayashi , Shimizu Y, Hong SA, Suganuma M, Lim IK

To understand the regulation of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated gastric carcinogenesis, we examined the effect of B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) expression on the biological activity of Tipα, an oncoprotein...
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Effects of luteolin on chemical induced colon carcinogenesis in high fat diet-fed obese mouse

Park JE, Kim E

PURPOSE: Colorectal cancer, which is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in developing and developed countries, is highly associated with obesity. The association is largely attributed to changes to...
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Helicobacter pylori Is Associated with miR-133a Expression through Promoter Methylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis

Lim JH, Kim SG, Choi JM, Yang HJ, Kim JS, Jung HC

BACKGROUND/AIMS: To investigate whether Helicobacter pylori eradication can reverse epigenetic silencing of microRNAs (miRNAs) which are associated with H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. METHODS: We examined expression and promoter methylation of miR-34b/c,...
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Effect of iron overload with ascorbic acid on experimental colon carcinogenesis in mice

Ahn TH, Kim SJ, Jeong JH, Nam SY, Yun YW, Lee BJ

Excessive iron can promote the production of free radicals, thereby leading to harmful effects on cancer and aging. Ascorbic acid is not only an antioxidant but also a co-factor of...
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Promoter methylation of cysteine dioxygenase type 1: gene silencing and tumorigenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma

Choi JI, Cho EH, Kim SB, Kim R, Kwon J, Park M, Shin HJ, Ryu HS, Park SH, Lee KH

BACKGROUNDS/AIMS: Cysteine dioxygenase type 1 (CDO1) acts as a tumor suppressor and is silenced by promoter methylation in various malignancies. The relationship between the CDO1 methylation status and hepatocellular carcinoma...
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The Role of IL-10 in Gastric Spasmolytic Polypeptide-Expressing Metaplasia-Related Carcinogenesis

Park DJ, Kim SE

No abstract available.
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Risk Factors for Gastric Tumorigenesis in Underlying Gastric Mucosal Atrophy

Song JH, Kim SG, Jin EH, Lim JH, Yang SY

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Atrophic gastritis is considered a premalignant lesion. We aimed to evaluate the risk factors for gastric tumorigenesis in underlying mucosal atrophy. METHODS: A total of 10,185 subjects who underwent upper...
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